Saturday, June 5, 2010

Who was Dennis Gabor?


You have till Friday 11th to send me a comment and tell me who he was... At least a 50 word paragraph.

Earn 10 points for your House!

26 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hello Miss Florence,

Who was Dennis Gabor ?
On the 5th of June 2010 was the 110th Birth anniversary of this electrical engineer who invented HOLOGRAPHY, commonly used to display static 3-D picture.
He was born in Budapest ,Hungary.Since he was very young he liked electronics and phisycs.Just before the second World war he moved to Great Britain where he did great inventions on the electron optics field.
He received the Nobel price in 1971.
His most favourite words were:
"You can't predict the future, but you can invent it."

Mili P 6B

Miss Florence said...

Mili,

First 10 house points!!!!!!!!!!!! Congrats...

santiago.fernandez said...

DENNIS GABOR
Born: 5 June 1900
Budapest, Hungary
Died: 8 February 1979 (aged 78)
London, England
Fields: Electrical engineering
Known for: Invention of holography
Notable awards: Nobel Prize in Physics (1971)
IEEE Medal of Honor (1970)

Miss Florence said...

Santi, 10 house points!!! Bravo!!!!

bautista said...

Hi Miss Ale
Dennis Gabor was born on June 5, 1900, in Budapest, Hungary, to S. Berthold and Ady (Jacobovits) Gabor. The son of a businessman, he received his education at the technical universities of Budapest (1918-1920) and Berlin (1920-1927). He earned both his diploma and his doctorate in engineering from the Technische Hochschule, in Charlottenburg, Germany, the former in 1924, the latter in 1927. He remained in Berlin upon graduation, working as a research engineer for Siemens and Halske until Hitler's rise to power in 1933. In 1947 a brilliant solution occurred to Gabor. What if one were to use the diffraction pattern (the fuzziness) in a way which provided one with all the information about the atomic lattice. That is, why not take an unclear electron picture, then clarify that picture by optical means. This was the genesis of holography. Gabor proposed to take an electron beam of light and split it in two, sending one beam to an object, the other to a mirror. Both would initially have the same wavelength and be in phase (coherent), but upon reflection from the object and the mirror back to the photographic plate, interference would be set up. Imagine ocean waves rolling in upon a long, sandy beach, one following another. Imagine them all equal in size, intensity, and timing.He invent the holography and he won the nobel prize in Physics in 1971. He died on 1979 at the age of 78.
Bye Bye
Bauti Vf 6C

Anonymous said...

Who was Dennis Gabor?

Hello Miss Florence:

Dennis Gabor studied electrical engineering in Germany, where he later developed the modern-day mercury-vapor lamp. After moving to England in 1933, he worked on electron microscope improvement, which led him in 1947 to conceive of a hologram, a method of using interference patterns in waves to record all information produced by an object reflecting or refracting the waves. His first holograms using mercury-vapor lamps demonstrated the principle, but were dim and difficult to view. Holograms require a coherent set of waves, not easily available until the advent of the laser in 1960. By 1964 holograms using lasers were producing three-dimensional images and since then many other applications of holograms have been developed.

Bye bye, see you on class

Milagros F, pchica 6B

Axel said...

Hi Miss Florence,
Dennis Gabor, Hungarian-born electrical engineer who won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1971 for his invention of holography, a system of lensless, three-dimensional photography that has many applications.
A research engineer for the firm of Siemens and Halske in Berlin from 1927, Gabor fled Nazi Germany in 1933 and worked with the Thomson-Houston Company in England, later becoming a British subject. In 1947 he conceived the idea of holography and, by employing conventional filtered-light sources, developed the basic technique. Because conventional light sources generally provided either too little light or light that was too diffuse, holography did not become commercially feasible until the demonstration, in 1960, of the laser, which amplifies the intensity of light waves.
I think that without him we couldn´t watch TV!
See you,

Axel G

Miss Florence said...

BRAVO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Anonymous said...

Dennis Gabor was born in Hungary and later moved to Germany where he worked as a research engineer from 1927 for the firm of Siemens and Halske in Berlin. Dennis Gabor, was a Jew, so he fled Germany in 1933 and went to Britain. In Britain he worked with Thomson-Houston Company, and later became a British citizen. In 1958 Dennis Gabor became a professor of applied electron physics at London’s Imperial College of Science and Technology where alongside he also continued his various researches. Dennis Gabor was awarded more than 100 patents for his different works. He died in London on 8th February 1979 at the age of 78.
harry 6a
sorry I couldnt get anything shorter.

Anonymous said...

Dennis Gabor

(Budapest, 1900 - Londres, 1979) Científico británico de origen húngaro, galardonado en 1971 con el premio Nobel de Física por la invención y el desarrollo de la holografía o fotografía tridimensional. Estudió Ciencias Técnicas en la Universidad de Budapest y obtuvo su doctorado en Ingeniería Técnica en la Escuela Técnica de Berlín. Después de trabajar en diversos laboratorios de investigación técnica alemanes, se trasladó a Gran Bretaña, donde fue agregado en la Sección de Investigación de la British Thomson Houston hasta el año 1949, en que pasó a ocupar la cátedra de Física Electrónica Aplicada en el Colegio Imperial de Ciencia y Tecnología de Londres.

sofia dithurbide

sofia said...

Dennis Gabor

(Budapest, 1900 - Londres, 1979) Científico británico de origen húngaro, galardonado en 1971 con el premio Nobel de Física por la invención y el desarrollo de la holografía o fotografía tridimensional. Estudió Ciencias Técnicas en la Universidad de Budapest y obtuvo su doctorado en Ingeniería Técnica en la Escuela Técnica de Berlín. Después de trabajar en diversos laboratorios de investigación técnica alemanes, se trasladó a Gran Bretaña, donde fue agregado en la Sección de Investigación de la British Thomson Houston hasta el año 1949, en que pasó a ocupar la cátedra de Física Electrónica Aplicada en el Colegio Imperial de Ciencia y Tecnología de Londres.

sofia dithurbide

maximo.bonora said...

Fore me Dennis was a very inteligent man because he invented holography and also on 5th of june 2010 was the 110th birth anniversary.also he invented the doodle.he was a very inteligent cientific.

Maxi.Bonora

Anonymous said...

Hello Miss Florance
Budapest, 1900 - London, 1979) Hungarian-born British scientist, winner of 1971 Nobel Prize in Physics for their invention and development of holography and three-dimensional photograph. He studied at the Technical University of Budapest and received his doctorate in Engineering at the Technical College of Berlin. After working in various German Technical Research Laboratories, he moved to Britain, which was added in the Investigation Section of the British Thomson Houston until 1949, when it became the chair of Applied Electronic Physics at Imperial College Science and Technology in London. However, the majority of the research work conducted in the U.S. company Columbia Broadcasting System in Stamford. Oscillography conducted research on cathode magnetic lenses, gas discharges and information theory. His most important discovery was the holography technique similar to photography which allows three-dimensional image reproduction faithful to the original. The main difference between both techniques is that the photograph records the image of the object, while the hologram is recorded light waves reflected from the object so that it is possible to rebuild with the same physical behavior.
KISSES
Valen p.6A Olivos

Carolina said...

Hello Miss Florence!
This is the information that I found about Dennis Grabor.
Dennis Gabor
Dennis Gabor was born on 1900 in Hungary and he died in 1979.
He was an electrical engineer who won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1971 for his invention of holography, a system of lensless, three-dimensional photography that has many applications.
A research engineer for the firm of Siemens and Halske in Berlin from 1927, Gabor fled Nazi Germany in 1933 and worked with the Thomson-Houston Company in England, later becoming a British subject. In 1947 he conceived the idea of holography and, by employing conventional filtered-light sources, developed the basic technique. Because conventional light sources generally provided either too little light or light that was too diffuse, holography did not become commercially feasible until the demonstration, in 1960, of the laser, which amplifies the intensity of light waves.
In 1949 Gabor joined the faculty of the Imperial College of Science and Technology, London, where in 1958 he became professor of applied electron physics. His other work included research on high-speed oscilloscopes, communication theory, physical optics, and television. Gabor was awarded more than 100 patents.
Kisses
Caro

Anonymous said...

Hello Miss Florence,
He was born as Gábor Dénes, into a Jewish family in Budapest, Hungary.
At the start of his career, he analysed the properties of high voltage electric transmission lines by using cathode-beam oscillographs, which led to his interest in electron optics. Studying the fundamental processes of the oscillograph, Gabor was led to other electron-beam devices such as electron microscopes and TV tubes.He was known for Invention of holography. He received the Nobel Price in 1971 of Physics, for his invention and development of the holographic method. He also received numerous awards. He developed an interest in social analysis and published The Mature Society: a view of the future in 1972. He died the 8th of February in 1979 in the age of 78.

Bye Florence!!! Lourdes Undem 6c

Anonymous said...

Hello Miss Florence,
He was born as Gábor Dénes, into a Jewish family in Budapest, Hungary.
At the start of his career, he analysed the properties of high voltage electric transmission lines by using cathode-beam oscillographs, which led to his interest in electron optics. Studying the fundamental processes of the oscillograph, Gabor was led to other electron-beam devices such as electron microscopes and TV tubes.He was known for Invention of holography. He received the Nobel Price in 1971 of Physics, for his invention and development of the holographic method. He also received numerous awards. He developed an interest in social analysis and published The Mature Society: a view of the future in 1972. He died the 8th of February in 1979 in the age of 78.

Bye Florence!!! Lourdes Undem 6c

Anonymous said...

Hi Florence,
Dennis Gabor was born on June 5th of 1900 and died on February 9th. Dennis got his first patent when he was 11 years old. He studied electrical engineering in Germany, where he later developed the modern-day mercuary-vapor lamp. After moving to England in 1933, he worked on electron microscope improvement, which led him in 1947 to conceive of a hologram, a method of using interference patterns in waves to record all information produced by an object reflecting the waves. His first holograms using mercury-vapor lamps domendtrated the principle, but were dim and difficult to view.
Flora B. 6A

Anonymous said...

Hello miss Florence,
Dennis Gabor was born in Hungary the 5 of June of 1900.
He was an electrical engineer who won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1971 for his invention of holography.
He used to dispalay 3D pictures
that has many applications.
He died the 8 February 1979 when he had 78 years in London.
Thanks,bye

Mati.F 6A

Anonymous said...

Hi Miss Florence,
Dennis was born on June 5th of 1900 and died on February 9th of 1979. Dennis got his first patent when he was 11 years old. He studied electrical enfineering in Germany, where he later developed the modern-day mercury-vapor lamp. AFter moving to England in 1833, he worked on electron microscope improvement, which led gim in 1947 to conceive of a hologram, a method of using interference patterns in waves to record all information produced by an object reflecting the waves. His first holograms using mercury-vapor lamps demostrated the principle, but were dim and difficult to view.

Anonymous said...

He was born on June 5th of 1900 and died on February 9th of 1979. Dennis got his first patent when he was 11 years old. He studied electrical engineering in Germany, where he later developed the modern-day mercury-vapor lamp. After moving to England in 1933, he worked on electron microscope improvement, which led him in 1947 to conceive of a hologram, a method of using interference patterns in waves to record all information produced by an object reflecting the waves His first holograms using mercury-vapor lamps demonstrated the principle, but were dim and difficult to view.

Anonymous said...

Hello Miss Florence
Who was Dennis Gabor? I know:
Dennis Gabor (In Hungarian: Gábor Dénes) (Budapest, Hungary, June 5, 1900 - London, United Kingdom, February 9, 1979) was a physical Hungarian, Nobel Prize in Physics, Known as the inventor of the holography. Also known by the Gabor Filter or development of scientific work on communication theory, physical optics or color TVPublished articles and tests on the influence of technology in modern society.Dennis Gabor was born into a wealthy family in Austro-Hungarian Empire, His father's family comes from Russia while his maternal family Spain, Possibly Sephardic Jews arrived in Hungary in the XVIII centuryDennis Gabor is part of a generation of brilliant Hungarian immigrant born between late XIX century and early twentieth century.In 1933Arrives Hitler power, because of their Jewish origin not renew its contract with Siemens and after a short time in Budapest, he decides to go to England a year later, still with the ravages of 1929 economic crisis, Foreigners have difficulty finding a job.In 1947, Has publicly holography or wavefront reconstruction cited as he gave international fame and the Nobel Prize in Physics 1971.
Thats all!
See you in class!
Keep on Blogging!
Lucia Leporati 6a Fleming

Anonymous said...

[b. Budapest, June 5, 1900, d. London, February 9, 1979]

Gabor got his first patent at the age of 11 (for a carousel using real tethered airplanes). He studied electrical engineering in Germany, where he later developed the modern-day mercury-vapor lamp. After moving to England in 1933, he worked on electron microscope improvement, which led him in 1947 to conceive of a hologram, a method of using interference patterns in waves to record all information produced by an object reflecting or refracting the waves. His first holograms using mercury-vapor lamps demonstrated the principle, but were dim and difficult to view. Holograms require a coherent set of waves, not easily available until the advent of the laser in 1960. By 1964 holograms using lasers were producing three-dimensional images and since then many other applications of holograms have been developed.

Michelle B 6C olivos

Anonymous said...

Hello Miss Florence...
Who was Dennis Gabor?

He was born as Gábor Dénes, into a Jewish family in Budapest, Hungary. He served with the Hungarian artillery in northern Italy during World War I. He studied at the Technical University of Budapest from 1918, later in Germany, at the Charlottenburg Technical University in Berlin, now known as the Technical University of Berlin. At the start of his career, he analysed the properties of high voltage electric transmission lines by using cathode-beam oscillographs, which led to his interest in electron optics. Studying the fundamental processes of the oscillograph, Gabor was led to other electron-beam devices such as electron microscopes and TV tubes. He eventually wrote his Ph.D. thesis concerning the cathode ray tube in 1927, and worked on plasma lamps.

Gabor, a Jew, fled from Nazi Germany in 1933, and was invited to Britain to work at the development department of the British Thomson-Houston company in Rugby, Warwickshire. During his time in Rugby, he met Marjorie Butler, and they married in 1936. He became a British citizen in 1946, and it was while working at British Thomson-Houston that he invented holography, in 1947. He experimented with a heavily filtered mercury arc light source. However, the earliest hologram was only realised in 1964 following the 1960 invention of the laser, the first coherent light source. After this, holography became commercially available.

Gabor's research focused on electron inputs and outputs, which led him to the invention of re-holography. The basic idea was that for perfect optical imaging, the total of all the information has to be used; not only the amplitude, as in usual optical imaging, but also the phase. In this manner a complete holo-spatial picture can be obtained. Gabor published his theories of re-holography in a series of papers between 1946 and 1951.


Belu B. 6B

Anonymous said...

He was born as Gábor Dénes,[2] into a Jewish family in Budapest, Hungary.[3] He served with the Hungarian artillery in northern Italy during World War I.[3] He studied at the Technical University of Budapest from 1918, later in Germany, at the Charlottenburg Technical University in Berlin, now known as the Technical University of Berlin.[2] At the start of his career, he analysed the properties of high voltage electric transmission lines by using cathode-beam oscillographs, which led to his interest in electron optics.[2] Studying the fundamental processes of the oscillograph, Gabor was led to other electron-beam devices such as electron microscopes and TV tubes. He eventually wrote his Ph.D. thesis concerning the cathode ray tube in 1927, and worked on plasma lamps.[2]

Gabor, a Jew, fled from Nazi Germany in 1933, and was invited to Britain to work at the development department of the British Thomson-Houston company in Rugby, Warwickshire. During his time in Rugby, he met Marjorie Butler, and they married in 1936. He became a British citizen in 1946,[4] and it was while working at British Thomson-Houston that he invented holography, in 1947.[5] He experimented with a heavily filtered mercury arc light source. [2] However, the earliest hologram was only realised in 1964 following the 1960 invention of the laser, the first coherent light source. After this, holography became commercially available.

Gabor's research focused on electron inputs and outputs, which led him to the invention of re-holography.[2] The basic idea was that for perfect optical imaging, the total of all the information has to be used; not only the amplitude, as in usual optical imaging, but also the phase. In this manner a complete holo-spatial picture can be obtained.[2] Gabor published his theories of re-holography in a series of papers between 1946 and 1951.[2]

Gabor also researched how human beings communicate and hear; the result of his investigations was the theory of granular synthesis, although Greek composer Iannis Xenakis claimed that he was actually the first inventor of this synthesis technique.[6]
Franco.r 6b

Anonymous said...

Hello Miss Florence,
Dennis Garbor was born in 1900 on the 5th of June in Budapest.
He was a physic that recived the Nobel price of physics in 1971 and he was famouse for inventing de holography and the 3D pictures.
He studied laboratories in Germany,London and Usa.
He did cientific works of of the comunication and colored TV.
He died the 9th of February in 1979

Anonymous said...

Dennis Gabor was born on June 5, 1900, in Budapest, Hungary, to S. Berthold and Ady (Jacobovits) Gabor. The son of a businessman, he received his education at the technical universities of Budapest (1918-1920) and Berlin (1920-1927). He earned both his diploma and his doctorate in engineering from the Technische Hochschule, in Charlottenburg, Germany, the former in 1924, the latter in 1927. He remained in Berlin upon graduation, working as a research engineer for Siemens and Halske until Hitler's rise to power in 1933. In 1947 a brilliant solution occurred to Gabor. What if one were to use the diffraction pattern (the fuzziness) in a way which provided one with all the information about the atomic lattice. That is, why not take an unclear electron picture, then clarify that picture by optical means. This was the genesis of holography. Gabor proposed to take an electron beam of light and split it in two, sending one beam to an object, the other to a mirror. Both would initially have the same wavelength and be in phase (coherent), but upon reflection from the object and the mirror back to the photographic plate, interference would be set up. Imagine ocean waves rolling in upon a long, sandy beach, one following another. Imagine them all equal in size, intensity, and timing.He invent the holography and he won the nobel prize in Physics in 1971. He died on 1979 at the age of 78.
bye, francesca molinari